Kate Cat Caught a Moose

I wrote this 193-word poem for my summer ESL class on phonics and accent reduction. It includes about a large number of minimal pair vocabulary words highlighting continuants and stops (esp. /s/ and /t/ endings), as well as various vowel sounds. It corresponds with Unit 10 of Judy Gilbert’s Clear Speech, 4th Edition. Enjoy, and feel free to share and reuse with attribution.


Kate Cat Caught a Moose

Kate the cat caught a moose;
She meant to catch a mouse.
She had it pinned with the pad of her paw
At night in the nice mouse house.

She never thought she might meet a moose instead
When she pawed in the hole meant for mice.
Most cats are meant to stalk rodents and rats,
Not to pat on the nose of a moose eating rice!

(Yes, the big moose ate rice;
You heard me right.
Rice is a nice thing
For mooses to bite!
It was bought from a bat
Bit by billions of lice;
Rice and lice look the same
When you turn out the lights!)

On the day of the race, Kate cat paid for two tickets:
She would go there by boat but come back by bus.
But really, she ought to have bought a bus pass
And pawned the boat ticket; boats just aren’t worth the fuss!

Besides, the base bus rates are nothing to balk at,
And the pace of a bus is a pretty good rate.
Talk to Martin the moose; he’ll tell you, “Take buses
If to talk face-to-face with a moose is your fate!”

Advertisements

Bookstore Present/Baseball Tryout

I wrote this 298-word poem for my summer ESL class on phonics and accent reduction. It includes about a dozen pairs of vocab words highlighting syllable stress of two-syllable verbs versus nouns, as well as compound nouns. It corresponds with Units 3–5 (particularly Unit 5) of Judy Gilbert’s Clear Speech, 4th Edition. Enjoy, and feel free to share and reuse with attribution.


Bookstore Present/Baseball Tryout

I present to you this present:
It’s an object from a bookstore.
Don’t object! And don’t reject it!
Before you do, why don’t you look more?

You should check out this cool bookmark
And the notebook that I bought you.
Oh, while I was at the checkout,
There’s a keychain that I got, too.

Even though I know books are a turnoff for you,
I’d like you to try out the book that I bought.
A notebook is special: it’s a record for you
To record, every day, all the thoughts that you thought.

So turn off your tablet and pack up your keyboard;
Let’s set up this notebook together.
The setup is easy; so soon, we’ll progress
To record all your progress forever.

Oh! I also got tickets for the baseball team’s tryout;
Let’s go eat a hot dog while watching them play.
Oh my gosh! Did you notice the man in the raincoat?
I remember his face from the news yesterday!

I suspect he’s the suspect from yesterday’s holdup,
So look out for him if you can.
The police have a lookout! Look close, can you see her?
She’s trying to start up that unmarked, white van!

It’s a transport they brought for transporting the convict.
(I mean that I’m sure they’ll convict him
When they see him in court, and they hold up the picture,
The one that was drawn by the victim.

But what if his story conflicts with the one
That the witnesses told their attorneys?
With that kind of conflict, the judge could reject it,
And rejects make excellent turnkeys.

Whatever that means!) So please, hold up your camera;
We’ll capture a picture and email the cop.
Oh, what an exciting event this has been
For you to record in the notebook I bought!


Brug Thugs Fear Pugs

Here’s another poem I wrote for my ESL students. We did an activity called “Seuss Sleuths,” in which we read excerpts from a Dr. Seuss book (One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish) and I challenged them to figure out the meter, rhyme scheme, themes, and other patterns employed in the book. Each of the students will now compose and recite an original Seussian poem; I wrote this one for the class as an example. I added some EXTREMELY GOOD MS Paint illustrations because, hey, it isn’t Seuss without pictures.


The Hug Bug

I like to hug
a kind of bug
The bug I hug
is called a Yug.

Yug bug

The Yug bug lives
inside a mug.
I keep the mug
under my rug.

I got a Brug
To watch my Yug.
I told the Brug
to watch the mug.
I asked the Brug
to watch the rug.

big Grug

The big Brug sat
next to my rug.
The bad Brug sat
upon my plug!
The plug came loose
with a big Tug! Tug!

The lights went out.
The room went dark.
My neighbor’s pug
began to bark.

loud pug

The Brug got scared.
He pulled the rug.
He tried to hide
inside the mug!

The mug got broke.
The Yug got free.
A Brug is much too big, you see.

The Yug bug crawled
out through a crack.
I fear he’s never coming back.

And now I have
no-one to hug
except a very frightened Brug.

Brug hug

A big Brug hug
is very snug,
but not as nice
as a Yug bug hug!


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.


I Hope to See the Forest

I wrote this 279-word poem for my summer ESL class on phonics and accent reduction. It includes about a dozen pairs of vocab words highlighting syllable count and long vs. short vowel sounds. The words came from the first two units of  Judy Gilbert’s Clear Speech, 4th Edition. Enjoy, and feel free to share and reuse with attribution.


I Hope to See the Forest

I hope to see the forest—
The land of oak and pine.
I hope to see the forest;
I’ll be the first in line.

I’ve waited to be entertained.
They’ve saved a seat for me on the train.
I’ll hop right on; it’s all arranged.
I hope the forest isn’t lame!

I got to pet a goat last fall,
Fed cheese to dancing mice.
I also got to pat a lamb,
Which caused me to feel nice!

I didn’t pet the bear cub.
(I’ve heard they can be mean!
They bite the most terrific bite
That you have ever seen!

My boss was bit by a baby bear;
It cracked his teeth and tangled his hair
And folded his fingers and then made him swear;
I think that’s correct, but then, I wasn’t there.)

My outfit is folded; my plane has landed;
I wouldn’t miss this for the world!
I can’t wait to see the seeds that were planted
By the men and the women, the boys and the girls.

I’ll measure it all with my measuring tape,
Put some some acorns in a pan and bake up an acorn cake,
Then I’ll tap with a pen or a pin on a rake
And I’ll rake all the leaves that have covered the lake!

I can add up the numbers from one to eleven;
I can draw you a sphere or a cube;
I can aid you in solving a crossword puzzle;
I’m always helpful and never rude.

Please take me to see the forest soon!

I hope to see the forest—
What’s that? The forest’s closed?
I guess it’s back into the closet
With all my forest clothes.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.